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Tuesday, January 28
 

6:00pm GMT

Pre-festival kickoff celebration
The unofficial PIDapalooza kickoff party! This year we’ll be at the fun and funky Time Out Market Lisbon, which has a great selection of local food and drinks you can purchase. 

Tuesday January 28, 2020 6:00pm - 8:00pm GMT
Time Out Market Lisbon Av. 24 de Julho 49, 1200-161 Lisboa, Portugal
 
Wednesday, January 29
 

9:30am GMT

10:00am GMT

Kickoff PIDapalooza2020! Welcome, introductory remarks, and lighting of the eternal flame
Speakers
avatar for PIDapalooza Committee

PIDapalooza Committee

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite


Wednesday January 29, 2020 10:00am - 10:30am GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

10:30am GMT

11:15am GMT

Coffee break
Wednesday January 29, 2020 11:15am - 11:30am GMT
Foyer by Sophia de Mello room

11:30am GMT

The FAIRytale of data & software citations
Once upon a time, PIDs were meant to be in data and software citations to give credit, solve the reproducibility crisis and enable reuse. And they lived happily ever after - OR did they?
Despite their great potential, PIDs for data and software citations are not adopted yet into common practice. Instead, social, technical, and policy issues complicate the tracking of data and software usage in scholarly publications. The FORCE 11 Software Citation Implementation Working Group recently proposed six software citation principles in order to standardize citation practices. This is certainly a twisting point in this modern PID drama, which outcome however still remains open.
Investigations of citations to Zenodo data and software objects that were captured by the implementation of the Asclepias Broker in Zenodo highlight the dark side of PIDs in data and software citations. Current citation practices and recommendations do not match proposed citation standards at all and there is more than one obstacle to overcome. Will darkness overpower the PID landscape or is there still hope for a happy ending?

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

Is there any better way to teach a lesson than telling a FAIRytale? The story will be transferred into an enchanting FAIRytale setting, including true heroes and (not so evil) villains. But before any of the characters can live happily ever after, they have to be courageous enough to solve many almost impossible quests.
Our FAIRytale setting allows to decrease the quantity of boring long texts on dust colored slides. Instead, I will bring colorful self-drawn sketches that transport our story line. Naturally, the story of PIDs in data and software citations is a dark one. But I will make sure that the participants won’t be haunted by nightmares afterwards.

This FAIRytale drama will generally allow people to relax and write emails during the session, if they can resist listening. However, the story telling won’t be linear, as I will offer the audience to choose different paths through the drama. Interactive storytelling allows the audience to take impact on the navigation of story sequences and may lead to the discovery of funny bonus material such as tremendously tragic PID deaths. Finally, the last act of this drama has not been written by reality yet. I will bring two possible endings, the catastrophe and a happy end. In the end, the audience will have to choose one ending which will influence our core message.

Speakers

Wednesday January 29, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

11:30am GMT

Building ORCID collaboration networks using PID graphs
Community adoption is key to the success of persistent identifiers. The FREYA project seeks to amplify its outputs and developments through its ambassador programme. Through dissemination of the outputs of the project and an insight into a broad range of communities interested in PIDs, the ambassador programme offers a chance for a community interested in PIDs to develop and share insights. Not only does this enable opportunities for community building, it also provides a forum where PID enthusiasts can share insights and ideas.

Section One (10 mins)
Community action is necessary within FREYA to iteratively understand how services can be developed and to validate those developments. FREYA is built on iterative engagement with a range of communities and this initial presentation will describe examples of this, success stories and challenges encountered.

Section Two (15 mins)
Following a competition held for FREYA ambassadors, experts within the field of PIDs across a broad range of communities, the winner will present an initiative to engage a community with persistent identifiers. The winning entry will be chosen based on the entries suitability for presentation in the PIDapalooza environment, the fit with the PID Communities theme and the FREYA project’s objectives. The winner is due to be selected by 18 October 2019.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

The suitability of the ambassador’s presentation for PIDapalooza will form part of the judging criteria. The first section of the session will be workshop style and includes questioning and feedback. 

Speakers
MA

Melroy Almeida

ORCID Community & Engagement Lead, Australian Access Federation


Wednesday January 29, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

11:30am GMT

I shall be released or how to stop worrying about new versions
Versioning research outputs and other scholar resources is essential, as things almost always change (people is one of the few exceptions). But how do you align change with persistence? The only solution is a solid system of versioning resources described by PIDs, understood and adopted by users. Unfortunately this is not the case.

This session will try to improve this by starting with a short summary of the current state and my ideas about the challenges and possible solutions. We will then use the remainder of the time in the session to collectively come up with two lists: a) what are the challenges with versioning, and b) what could be solutions to improve the current situation.

If there is enough interest in the topic, the session is intended as a starting point for a longer discussion in the PID community about how we can improve versioning with the goal of both improving the technical infrastructure, but more importantly clear documentation when and how to version scholarly resources.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

After a 10 min introduction I will use the remainder of the session for an open discussion. At the end of the session I want to have generated two lists with the audience: challenges and solutions.

Speakers

Wednesday January 29, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

12:00pm GMT

Europe PMC: Making connections beyond papers, people, data
As a database for life-science literature, Europe PMC, is constantly looking to increase the knowledge that can be extracted by users. In this presentation, I will point out the connections that can be found in the biomedical literature and built via PIDs. Connections between disparate research objects such as journal articles, preprints, data, authors, institutions and grants, means that Europe PMC is able to provide services that address a variety of use cases. Take preprints for example: researchers can link preprints indexed in Europe PMC to their ORCID profile; and see these reflected within the author profile provided by Europe PMC. By linking these to the journal article versions, the publishing community can determine how a study evolved and how long it takes for a study to progress from preprint format to publication in a journal; by exposing the version history of a preprint, an editor or reader can understand the provenance of the article and how a published study evolved; by linking funding information to the publication, a reader can find other publications that have been funded by the same grant.

I will demonstrate a selection PID services at Europe PMC that connect up resources in new ways or link to resources that are currently emerging with their own bespoke PIDs such as grants and institutions. With this I’d like to highlight the ‘beast of information’ offered by Europe PMC, and in so doing inspire the audience to make better connections with PIDs.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

After a 15-20 minute presentation I plan to engage the audience via mentimeter/ show of hands/ use of paddles with set answers eg : yes, I can help, No idea how to help, want to help - don’t know how?

Example questions to put to the audience:
  1. To understand the audience: What PIDs are you using in your day jobs beyond those for publications (DOIs), data (accession numbers; DOIS) and researchers (ORCID, ISNIs) -.
  2. E-PMC specific questions:
    -Do you use EPMC’s repository, API or website?
    -Is there PID stuff you have, that we could link up to Europe PMC - eg text mining results?
  3. What will you do NOW to better connect the research world: (an inspirational question, so show examples I’ve collected earlier - maybe ask them to tweet these?)
    -connect the PIDs you have with those of other organisations?
    -make it easier for the community to use PIDs?
    -disambiguate the resources you use - include identifiers for these in anything shared publicly: blogs, papers, preprints, posters?
    -promote the use of PIDs in your organisation - provide slides, train the trainers?
    -other?


Wednesday January 29, 2020 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

12:00pm GMT

Using PIDs at the US Department of Energy to interlink research and increase the pace of scientific discovery
The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) has been developing PID infrastructure and offering PID services since 2004. Through our memberships in Crossref, DataCite, and ORCID, we have created a community using PIDs to track research outputs, make DOE-funded research results more discoverable, and to highlight connections within the research ecosystem. OSTI is working to create a network of connections across the research lifecycle – linking awards, researchers, facilities, instruments, publications, datasets, software and more. OSTI.GOV, DOE’s primary search tool for research results, is one example of how we are creating and displaying these interlinked connections. An OSTI.GOV journal article record can include the authors’ ORCID iDs linking their ORCID records, linked datasets and software used to produce the article, supplemental figures associated with the article, the instrument used to collect the associated data, and in the future link to grant/award DOIs funding the article. OSTI.GOV shows relationships pulled in from ORCID, Crossref, Scholix, and the US Patent and Trademark Office not just for journal article records, but for all resource types. DOE user facilities are another example from our community, using persistent identifier services provided by OSTI to make linkages across the research lifecycle – connecting researchers to time awarded at facilities, to datasets produced at the facilities, and to the resulting publications. All of these connects are made with relationships between persistent identifiers. OSTI is continuously improving PID infrastructure and services to support the DOE community in creating an interlinked research ecosystem.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

I want to provide a bit of background about the work DOE is doing but make the presentation interactive by engaging in a dialog about how the audience is using persistent identifiers to interlink research objects – are they using related identifier metadata fields, are they pulling in relationships from other sources, what other sources are they using (Event Data, Crossref, Scholix, etc.), are they curating the metadata describing with the related resource, are they integrating with ORCID? To make the presentation more interactive, I plan to use Mentimeter to ask the audience these questions and discuss the answers. 

Speakers
avatar for Carly Robinson

Carly Robinson

Assistant Director, Department of Energy - Office of Scientific and Technical Information
Carly Robinson is the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Assistant Director for Information Products and Services. The Office of Information Products and Services (IPS) focuses on the dissemination of DOE-funded research and development... Read More →


Wednesday January 29, 2020 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

12:00pm GMT

The EOSC PID Policy
As part of the European Open Science Cloud Governance, the EOSC FAIR Working Group is developing a policy on the use of PIDs to support FAIR research. The initial draft of this policy will be published by the end of 2019 and so this talk will be the first presentation of the policy and an opportunity for the wider community to feedback on a policy that will begin to the set the direction for the use of PIDs in research across Europe.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

While we will use the first half of the session to explain the policy, where it has come from and what it contains, we are keen to get feedback so that the draft policy can be improved early in 2020 before being finalised. As this feedback is so important, we will ensure that the second half of the session gives ample opportunity for discussion of the policy and feedback from attendees. We will welcome diverse perspectives and actively encourage those from diverse background to contribute their thoughts.


Wednesday January 29, 2020 12:00pm - 12:30pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

12:30pm GMT

Lunch
Wednesday January 29, 2020 12:30pm - 1:30pm GMT
Vitorino Nemésio Room

1:30pm GMT

ORCID Mythbusters: The Game You've All Been Waiting For!
All good parties have games, and the game at this PID Party is all about busting myths about ORCID!

(And maybe there's one extra game thrown in as well. And a special party favor for our crew of Mythbusters!)

ORCID has grown, and so have the myths around us. We envision this session to be raucously interactive, with the audience divided into teams of 4-6 people. Each team will try their hand at busting the most pervasive myths about ORCID. We'll also choose, as a group, the three most confusing myths and brainstorm the best ways to address them. 



Speakers
avatar for Julie Petro

Julie Petro

Director of Communications, ORCID


Wednesday January 29, 2020 1:30pm - 2:30pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

1:30pm GMT

PID Party! Enter the Feedback Loop
ConfIDent – our project of building an interdisciplinary, open and reliable service for finding and publishing data on scientific conferences inlcuding PIDs – is here! Last year we told you, how we envision this platform as a tool for the scientific community to avoid the horror of participating in the “wrong” conferences. Now, this vision is a fully fletched third party (DFG) funded project in the first stage.

Scientific fact: This project will only be as imagined, when the number of engaged users will exceed the magical threshold of the network effect.

Hypothesis: We’ll get there by knowing the user stories and user experiences from the very beginning.
So here we are, asking you to enter the feedback loop, asking you to help us change the game for the better by implementing open science. We need your input to make this a trusted metadata treasure trove. One that’s user friendly and on point. Round one of the feedback loop will start with a quiz. Right here, right now. Get your smart phones out and let’s play!

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

A central part will be a fun Polleverywhere quiz, with which I want to engage the participants / audience and get the feedback we need for our project at the same time.

Speakers
avatar for Philip Strömert

Philip Strömert

research associate / ontology engineer, German National Library of Science and Technology
You can talk to me about: ontologies, open science, linguistics, culture studies, philosophy, electronic music, permaculture and such.I came to TIB in 2018 doing publication metadata maintainance in VIVO & Pure, python based data analysis and open access fonds management. Since January... Read More →


Wednesday January 29, 2020 1:30pm - 2:30pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

1:30pm GMT

PID Party! Principles. Principles? "The Who needs Principles?" Game Show
Are you the sort of person who always does the right thing? Does your metadata sparkle? But how well do you really understand what the correct way is to setup an identification system and what should it include? This game-show format will engage the participants in a competitive quiz about what should be the core principles of an identification system. Selected participants will compete for prizes and drink coupons when the correctly identify how identifier systems should be constructed. The ISO technical subcommittee on Identification & Description is developing a set of principles on identification, which will be published in 2020. This draft, its definitions, and principles will serve as the basis for the quiz materials. A draft of the principles will be circulated to ISO member bodies in January, so you won't have much time to find it, study it, and prepare for the quiz!

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

The session will include audience participation throughout, with between 5-10 pairs of participants competing. Participants will be encouraged (i.e., bribed) to participate through the opportunity to show off their skills, share their knowledge, and by the chance to walk away with quality prizes and vouchers for a free drink at the end of the day.

Speakers

Wednesday January 29, 2020 1:30pm - 2:30pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

2:30pm GMT

Serial Jam Session with ISSN
The portfolio of services provided by the ISSN portal is expanding to support the identification of continuing resources and share information about their preservation in the digital scholarly environment.
How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

ISSN Jazz list unveiled!

Cantaloupe Island / Herbie Hancock
Ascenseur pour l'échafaud : générique / Miles Davis
Naima / John Coltrane
Poinciana / Ahmad Jamal
Relaxing at Camarillo / Charlie Parker
Stolen Moments / Oliver Nelson
Bonus Track : Lisboa / Melody Gardot

Speakers
avatar for Gaelle Bequet

Gaelle Bequet

Director, ISSN INTERNATIONAL CENTRE
I am a librarian and a researcher in information science. I am into persistent identifiers, metadata quality, and digital preservation.


Wednesday January 29, 2020 2:30pm - 3:00pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

2:30pm GMT

Dirty PIDs – Let’s Roll in the Mud
In many ways, we have a world split in two. East and west. North and south. Mind and matter. SSH and STEM. Ordered and disordered. Metrics and altmetrics. Curated data and the opposite. Planners and spontaneous people.

Two ways of looking at PIDs: One is that everything and everyone should have a PID so that we can monitor and control behavior. Another way of looking is to create PIDs where it makes sense. Create PIDs where it is fun! Be prepared for dirty data and be aware that you might have to do some cleaning. It might even be that you have to clean – YOU and not just your housekeeper. If you try to implement PIDs where it makes sense or is fun, you may get other results than just applying it to either SSH or STEM. In the STEM world, there is this smooth machine with articles, citations and funding and all over again. In the SSH world it is so difficult and not worth trying.

The OPERA (OPEn Research Analytics) project tries to find engines in and drivers for “open research analytics”. Open means: data and tools for analysis are openly available. OPERA tries to look beyond the “smooth machines” in STEM. We collaborate with the ReAct project, which is looking at impact in humanities, and with the ORCID, task force Academia & Beyond that is describing use cases for ORCID in the humanities.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We will split the audience in two according to their feeling – are you predominant a planner or a spontaneous person. Each group now has to come up with as many meaningful or fun ways of using PIDs in scholarly communication. 

Speakers
avatar for Poul Melchiorsen

Poul Melchiorsen

Specialist Consultant, Aalborg University Library
Coming out of philosophy, physics and computer science - now interested in research analysis, visualization and description across disciplines.


Wednesday January 29, 2020 2:30pm - 3:00pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

2:30pm GMT

The Path to Department Level PIDs
The introduction of ROR's minimum viable product for unique institutional identifiers provides a platform on which many of us hope to build. We have been exploring ways to implement institutional identifiers down to the department level for RORs. A simple parent/child model would be the easiest approach, but relationships among and between organizations is both complex and dynamic. For the use case of departmental bibliographies, it may be that this is enough and is a reasonable first step as we explore expanding institutional relationships in more detail.

Speakers

Wednesday January 29, 2020 2:30pm - 3:00pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

3:00pm GMT

Choose your own curation adventure: a journey through institutional metadata in the Research Organization Registry
A marine science laboratory in coastal California. A joint medical school between two universities. A German institution with four different versions of its name (German, English, Slovenian, Croatian). A small college in Vermont that is shutting down.

In a registry of research organizations, does the marine science laboratory belong? Should there be one record for the medical school, or two, or…..? Which should be the official name of the German institution? How should the registry indicate that the Vermont college is no longer active? These are actual examples of the types of data curation decisions that the Research Organization Registry (ROR) is encountering as it builds out the registry following the initial launch in January 2019.

Much of the focus in the PID community tends to be on maintaining and supporting identifiers themselves, but what practices should we follow to manage all of the other metadata associated with PIDs? To solve this problem in an institutional context, ROR is establishing a community curation board to bring together experts from across the PID, library, and research communities to collectively approach the challenges and opportunities in curating institutional metadata. In this interactive session, participants will step into the shoes of our fledgling curation committee and walk through actual curation scenarios, working together to design solutions to institutional identity problems. Choose your own curation adventure! Help us design workflows and policies that support both PIDs and all of the metadata around them! This session will be facilitated by the ROR Outreach team along with members of the ROR Community.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We are planning to use an interactive “choose-your-own-adventure” format for the majority of the session, in which participants will work in small groups to walk through specific curation scenarios - some of which the ROR team has already been working on - and come up with their own ideas and solutions, and then report back to the whole group about their experience. 

Speakers
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite


Wednesday January 29, 2020 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

3:00pm GMT

Connecting Chemistry through PIDs
When is one chemical structure the same as another, and when is it not? How can we reliably tell what chemicals are different and which are the same? How do current solutions for reliable identification of chemical substances fit within the wider PID landscape? What are the opportunities for tighter integration of chemistry within PID networks and graphs?

In this session, we will encourage an audience of non-chemists to think like chemists and introduce them to InChI – the IUPAC International Chemical Identifier. We’ll showcase how InChI is currently used for information retrieval, navigating across chemistry resources and linking other research objects with chemical structures. Finally, we’ll pose some questions to stimulate ideas about how the InChI community can best work with wider stakeholder groups to bridge across worlds through PIDs.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

At the start of the session we intend challenging participants to adopt the persona of a chemist and spot the differences and similarities between different chemical structures. Towards the end we very much hope to engage the audience in discussion of opportunities for InChI in worlds beyond chemistry.

Speakers
avatar for Henry Rzepa

Henry Rzepa

Imperial College London
I am a computational chemist (which means using computers to model chemistry and the behaviour of molecules) with an interest in how the Internet can be exploited to enhance the stories one can tell about chemistry.


Wednesday January 29, 2020 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

3:00pm GMT

The swh-id: a digital fingerprint identifying software source code
The Software Heritage universal archive of software source code relies on well established techniques used in software development communities to identify the over 20 billion code artefacts it preserves - cryptographic hashes in a Merkle DAG data structure.

In this session we will first explain the motivations of this choice, recalling Paskin's essential distinction between digital identifiers of an object (DIOs) and identifiers of digital objects (IDOs).

Then we will focus on the properties of the Software Heritage Identifiers (SWH-IDs) that matter most in a reproducibility and long term archival framework: intrinsic integrity and independent verifiability.

Finally, we will show practically how they can be used to improve current research publication practices.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We will do a live demonstration of the swh-identify module that can extract the PID from the digital artefact.
Also we will show how to resolve an swh-id on the online archive and how to find a swh-id of a preserved artefact.

Finally, we will invite participants that want to preserve their repositories or important repositories to submit the code with Software Heritage's "save code now" feature.

Speakers

Wednesday January 29, 2020 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

3:30pm GMT

Coffee break
Wednesday January 29, 2020 3:30pm - 3:45pm GMT
Foyer by Sophia de Mello room

3:45pm GMT

Fantastic PIDs and Where NOT to Find Them
One would have thought we’re probably not that far away from completing the Catalogue of Life, this vast encyclopedia of all animal and plant species, right? Not even close! Even though bio-taxonomists have tried for centuries to systematically document life, they couldn’t even imagine the complications these dark ages of digital information brought to their noble cause. Apparently, chameleons, spiders, and big cats don’t only hide in nature, but also behind pay-walled publications and badly scanned 18th-century manuscripts. Millions of figures, taxonomic descriptions, and collected materials end up lost, destroyed, and undiscoverable to the research community.

This is a story of how Plazi, a non-profit association for bio-taxonomic literature, took up the task to liberate life from these PDF cages, give it a FAIR chance, and with the help of Zenodo put a PID on it and provide a safe and sustainable home. It is also a story on how, similar to wildlife, even data can disguise itself inside papers but eventually using the power of PIDs join the tree of life and make it bloom. We’ll explore what these fantastic PIDs look like, and how we make it possible for anybody to find them even in the darkest corners of tropical rainforests and harsh deserts.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

As the audience starts to get familiar with the inner workings of bio-taxonomy and the metadata and descriptions of new species, we’ll proceed with introducing an interactive game of worldwide hide-and-seek with some fantastic beasts such as the Jackalope, the Wolpertinger, Bigfoot, Chupacabra, and others. After some live cataloging of these peculiar “species”, we’ll demonstrate how their metadata descriptions are crucial to building our own mythical book of life and share it with our community.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Ioannidis

Alex Ioannidis

Zenodo Service Lead, CERN


Wednesday January 29, 2020 3:45pm - 4:15pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

3:45pm GMT

PIDs for Open Data - How GRID PIDs are enabling the Linked Open Data platform SN SciGraph
We want to tell the story of how persistent identifiers can help in a data enrichment workflow and enable linking data to provide a well structured and complete dataset from end to end, for the benefit of the Open Data community. We will talk about how GRID organisation IDs are used to untangle scientific affiliation strings and help build the Linked Open Data platform SN SciGraph.

By using persistent identifier in this Linked Open Data knowledge graph we can showcase the influence and importance of Open Access publishing, for example by providing an overview of Open Access publications of an organisation. Additionally, we can show how Open Access publications are related to funding, or in what areas of research Open Access research is especially prominent.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We would like to start off our talk by linking (with) the audience. We do connect individuals in the audience with a link that share a common attribute, like the day they arrived, the country they come from or the number of PIDapalooza festivals they have been to, etc. This as an real-life exercise that resembles how we linked the data that is available on SN SciGraph as an introduction to our talk.




Wednesday January 29, 2020 3:45pm - 4:15pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

3:45pm GMT

A mob of kangaroos: ARDC’s national PIDs strategy to support identifying, linking and citing Australian research
Have you ever seen a Kangaroo hop? They rarely go in a straight line, bouncing wildly this way and that. When they all get together, they’re called a mob. They’re a pretty big mob too with boomers (they’re the guys), jills (they’re the girls) with pockets big enough for joeys (babies) and occasionally, missing car keys. Similar to a mob of kangaroos, Australian research institutions are all different shapes and sizes, have different strategies and directions, and different sized funding pockets. What brings us together though is a desire to support Australian research quality, use and impact. The Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC), through our connected research (PIDs) strategy, are supporting and enabling Australian research institutions to do just that.

A research data “commons” has at its foundation some “common” approaches to information and knowledge management. ARDC collaborates with other Australian research agencies to establish underpinning national information infrastructure that improves the identification, discovery, linking and citation of research data, software and related materials. This national infrastructure supports standard definitions, reference values, and identifiers for these common entities and links them to key elements of the research universe such as grants, projects, researchers, and organisations. Shared scientific terminology is a further level of connectedness aspired to in a data commons.

PIDs are a core component of this national (and global) infrastructure, enabling research concepts, outputs and objects to be joined up, creating a richer more coherent and connected experience. Without these sophisticated and common approaches to information and knowledge, Australian research will not be part of or benefit from the emerging global research information networks. At national and global scale, cottage industry references to crucial elements of the research enterprise will not suffice. PIDs provide industrial-level standard referencing and identification which are the building blocks of joined-up global research information systems.

The ARDC provides, supports and connects with several persistent identifier services including DOI, IGSN, Handle, ORCID and PURL in addition to being the originator and home of a new PID on the block, the Research Activity Identifier (RAID). As part of the national research infrastructure we facilitate access to such services for Australian research institutions. In addition, we actively promote the use of PIDs to connect research coherently through a program of PIDagogy, outreach and community engagement.

New drivers in the research environment and internal to our organisation have inspired us to re-evaluate our PID services. We are asking ourselves critical questions such as: Why would researchers and research organisations need PIDs? What problems do they actually solve for them? Are the PID services we are supporting the ones we should continue to support? Who uses these, who needs to use these, how well are they being used, valued? What makes a good PID system? What are the PID properties required to ensure sustainability? What are good financial models for PID services? How can we better articulate the value of PIDs in workflows? How do we improve community buy in from our mob of kangaroos?

While we are asking ourselves these questions, we recognise that others are also asking these questions because PIDs are global in nature. Therefore, the ARDC sponsored a three part global PID series to look in more detail at some of these questions. The workshops were held in Singapore, the UK and the USA in collaboration with ORCID, FREYA, Jisc and California Digital Library. Input from these workshops has helped to shape our revised connect research strategy and we trust this is of interest to the mob at PIDapalooza.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We’ll start with some questions and fun facts about kangaroos and get the audience to buy into the analogy with the Australian connect research (PIDs) environment. We may possibly wear kangaroos masks or tails or...


Wednesday January 29, 2020 3:45pm - 4:15pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

4:15pm GMT

Data curation and trust in a PID - how do we maintain the right balance?
Errors in PID data endangers long term trust and validity that is vital for the success of a persistent identifier. Errors that may not surface until data is processed, aggregated or displayed in new ways. We will discuss the problem space and focus on metadata errors in publication data. We will show examples and share our experience in working on corrections for such errors, and invite the audience to propose other community efforts for maintaining a high PID quality.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

Invite audience to discuss how they can participate to correct data errors in their environment.  Should result in one (or more) post-it’s per person to be put on a wall for all to see.  During remainder of festival all are invited to add new ideas (post-it) to this wall. Either throughout the festival or at the end of festival audience is invited to pick whichever post-it from the wall, they can use for inspiration back home. Hence sharing good idea across participants.


Wednesday January 29, 2020 4:15pm - 4:45pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

4:15pm GMT

idlib: A homogenous model for heterogenous *data
There are countless PID systems, each with its own quirks and peculiarities. Even technical users of PID systems may not be PID experts. Do they need to be? How can we make the heterogeneity of PID systems and their features more accessible to technical users? We suggest that one potential way to achieve this is by creating enshrining technical knowledge about specific PID systems into libraries for major programming languages.

This talk presents a unifying conceptual model for understanding identifiers, metadata, data, persistence grantees etc. that is independent of any particular identifier system. We describe the series of use cases that led to the development of this model and present an implementation of model as a python library. Finally, we report our experiences using an earlier versions of the library as part of an automated curation pipeline for a major neuroscience consortium.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

I am eager for feedback from the community on the core model proposed, and have a number of questions at the start of the talk to get the audience thinking about their use of PID systems.

Speakers

Wednesday January 29, 2020 4:15pm - 4:45pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

4:15pm GMT

People, projects and institutes 1920 to 1945: a treasure chest for German science history
In 2020, the German Research Foundation (DFG) celebrates its 100th anniversary. While the organisation today has a very effective position with an annual budget of over 3.3 billion euros, it was initially entrusted in 1920 as the so-called "Notgemeinschaft" (emergency association) with the task of helping German science, if you will, to get back on its feet after WWI. On the occasion of its hundredth anniversary, the DFG takes the opportunity to open its archives. The aim is to create an information system that will make it possible to research more than 50,000 funding cases (both approved and rejected) from more than 13,000 academics and researchers at around 1,200 institutions. As the time window suggests, on the one hand great projects are made visible that were later honoured with Nobel Prizes. On the other hand, there will also be those projects with which German scientists have made a name for themselves in a criminal and inhuman way. PID play a central role in the development and design of the system. They help to connect the DFG-internal data with other sources and thus to clean and enrich them massively. The (semi-automatic) matching with PIDs from Wikidata and the GND played a crucial role in cleaning the data and discerning homonyms and synonyms. After that profiles of person, facility and project profiles in Wikipedia could be matched and also data from a very rich people database on German history (www.deutsche-biographie.de). The lecture focuses on these PID aspects and outlines the special possibilities and challenges that need to be considered when working with historical data.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

I will illustrate the main accents and challenges of the PID application with as few slides as possible, in order to allow as much time as possible for questions, comments and perhaps also suggestions for the further development of the project idea.

Speakers
JG

Juergen Guedler

Head of Group Information Management, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)


Wednesday January 29, 2020 4:15pm - 4:45pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

4:45pm GMT

Keynote: "The Science Ecosystem and Open Science: a Multi-Legged Stool" (Beth Plale, NSF)
Open science applied to the scientific research enterprise is a principle of openness that will advance the frontiers of knowledge and help ensure a nation’s future prosperity. Realizing open science in academic research has challenges both social/organizational and technical. Science is increasingly big, convergent, and highly computational. Yet open science seeks from researchers more attention to research processes, more thought to reuse of existing data and subsequent uses of data, and more thought to the reproducibility and replicability of one’s work. Open science seeks changes in massive computational infrastructure in support of science for greater responsiveness to reproducibility. It seeks business models from stakeholders that make core components of the data ecosystem of services more sustainable. Persistent IDs form an essential part of the base infrastructure. The pieces need to fit together.

We take an optimistic, multi-stakeholder view of the current state of open science in the scientific enterprise, with an eye to both successes and open challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Plale

Beth Plale

National Science Foundation
Dr. Plale is program officer at the National Science Foundation in the United States working on open science. She is also a Full Professor in the Dept. of Intelligent Systems Engineering at Indiana University Bloomington who has authored over 150 peer-reviewed publications. She is... Read More →


Wednesday January 29, 2020 4:45pm - 5:30pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

5:30pm GMT

Evening reception
We'll bring the first day of PIDapalooza to a close with a PID party all our own in the beautiful Vitorino Nemésio Room overlooking the Tagus River waterfront. Enjoy light snacks and beverages on us, make new PID friends, and show off your smarts at the legendary PIDapalooza Pub Quiz with expert quizmaster Ed Pentz! 

Wednesday January 29, 2020 5:30pm - 7:30pm GMT
Vitorino Nemésio Room
 
Thursday, January 30
 

8:30am GMT

Coffee
Thursday January 30, 2020 8:30am - 9:00am GMT
Foyer by Sophia de Mello room

9:00am GMT

Lightning talks
Thursday January 30, 2020 9:00am - 10:00am GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

10:00am GMT

Using PIDs (ORCID, ROR and DOI) to Re-think Researcher Recognition
Funders invest $1.9 trillion a year in research. Improved tools for assessing outputs are needed to help evaluate outcomes and to better target future funding decisions.

The emergence of PIDs in the research workflow make it possible to view granular, transparent, open, verifiable attribution - all consolidated into a convenient “Open Ledger”. A recognition counter (“COG”) is combined with recognition taxonomies (such as CRediT) to signal contribution. Visualization tools and heuristics help interpret the Open Ledger data in the context of specific use-cases, and to filter-out gaming behaviors.

The presentation will discuss the operational and technical challenges of integrating PIDs and show how they are leveraged to create new value on a live platform. The role of individual recognition will be discussed and contrasted with institutional (“curated”) recognition, including the potential to encourage Open Research behaviors and outputs.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

The presentation will start with a hands-on audience participation where attendees will be invited to undertake a live recognition of their colleagues related to PIDapalooza 2020.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Wynne

Richard Wynne

Founder, Rescognito
@RichardCDW


Thursday January 30, 2020 10:00am - 10:30am GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

10:00am GMT

Metadata activism: What can YOU do?
Without metadata…
ZERO HUNGER will take longer.
GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING will cost more.
ENDING POVERTY will not happen soon enough.

But, how do we focus our actions to ensure the greatest impact? Metadata 2020 was established in 2017 with the goal of ensuring richer, connected, and reusable, open metadata for all research outputs, which will advance scholarly pursuits for the benefit of society. In this session, we will share our call to action and sample models of participation, and work with you to translate these materials into your personalized plan for what YOU will do and how you will encourage your communities to participate. Awaken your inner activist and lend a hand as we create a movement that ensures metadata’s lasting impact - because Connecting Research Matters!

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

A majority of this session will be dedicated to creating individual action plans for participating in this movement. There is a serious side to the topic but it is designed to be completely interactive as well as productive for each participant.

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

UC3 Director, California Digital Library- CDL
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
avatar for Laura Paglione

Laura Paglione

Upholder, Metadata 2020
Throughout my career, I have embraced my nonlinear path as an engineer, graphic designer, consultant and computer scientist. My vast experience and unique point of view have helped me build a community of clients, colleagues, mentors, and mentees around a common goal: accessible innovation... Read More →


Thursday January 30, 2020 10:00am - 10:30am GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

10:00am GMT

Move slowly away from the legacy of print publishing
The legacy issues of journal publications are a big problem. One of the issues is a form of lock-in for all actors. One of these issues is versioning.

You’d not expect it to be that hard, right? We have PIDs for articles (DOIs), just assign new PIDs for each version and then make sure they are all linked together.

But:
  • what about the indexers of my content, they don’t acknowledge versions
  • what about my hosting system, they don’t recognize versions and ask me to overwrite if I make changes
  • what about corrections and retractions, they are separate publications, linked to which version
  • what about the referencing systems, how will they know which version I want to cite
  • what about recording the impact of this work if it’s split over many versions
  • what about the infrastructure I built, which is one PID-one article
  • what about, what about?

Not so simple.

In this session we’ll interactively explore:
  • What’s the problem
  • What appears to be preventing or slowing changing
  • Who do we need to lobby for change
This session is born out of a 20-minute brainstorming session between an eLife, PMC and Erudit representative. We’d like to take it further by sense checking the concepts proposed, the barriers to change and then triaging the issues to tackle.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Harrison

Melissa Harrison

Team Leader, Literature Services, EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute
Team Leader, Literature Services, EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute


Thursday January 30, 2020 10:00am - 10:30am GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

10:30am GMT

Coffee break
Thursday January 30, 2020 10:30am - 11:00am GMT
Foyer by Sophia de Mello room

11:00am GMT

Unified identifier Management and Resolution Services
How to develop a holistic PID management service? Until now, the management and resolving of PIDs has been spread out over different services and organization in Finland. This modus operandi is inefficient and does not enable visibility to whether material has several identifiers, and how they are possibly resolved. AT the same time the use of identifiers is increasing. We present a plan of a service for:
  • centralised PID creation and management
  • harmonising pid syntax and use of a checksum
  • centralized resolution management
  • reliable and sustainable identifier interlinkage
  • improved material life cycle and provenance management
  • decreasing risk of reputation loss for the organization due to non-reliable identifiers
  • quality assurance over changes in organization or technical services
  • provide PIDs for external partners
  • The use of the PID management service will be exemplified through cases (e.g. Finnish Research Information Hub ).


Thursday January 30, 2020 11:00am - 11:30am GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

11:00am GMT

Conference Identifiers, the story so far and how to proceed.
The Conference ID working group has a simple goal: identify conferences in a landscape of many similarly named organizations and constantly changing elements like organizers, names, publishers and so on. The idea is simple, the implementation not so much. In this session, we would like to introduce briefly the current state of the working group, as well as some current issues for the audience to be discussed.

Issues include for example:
  • Are use cases for conference identifiers missing?
  • What identifiers to use?
  • Who should manage the issuing of the identifiers?
  • How do we promote the new identifiers?

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

I would join forces with Patricia Feeney (Crossref) and Stephanie Hagemann (TIB), make sure that we use at most 10 minutes for the report, so that the majority of the time will be used for discussions. After all, we do not want to report at this time, we really have some questions and need answers.

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 11:00am - 11:30am GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

11:00am GMT

PIDforum.org - a global discussion platform about PIDs
The PID Forum (www.pidforum.org) is a global information and discussion platform for all things PID-related, which aims to bring together the various communities working with persistent identifiers in the research world. It’s a virtual space to share best practices, announce events, ask questions, have discussions, and more. Founded by the FREYA project and launched during PIDapalooza 2019, the PID Forum is now 300+ members strong and growing fast, and is also the home of the FREYA Knowledge Hub.

During this interactive session, we will be asking you, the PID community, for your input to help us continue to grow the PID Forum’s success and make it even better . We’ll discuss what kind of topics and information you'd like to see on the Forum, how to make it as global and inclusive as possible, how to best engage the wider community and more.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We will dedicate most of the session to audience participation in break-out group exercises, with different groups working on different topics to give feedback on, including 1) content for the PID Forum, 2) PID Forum sustainability 3) the Knowledge Hub.  We will also collect more general audience feedback via the interactive presentation tool Mentimeter.

Structure of the event:
5 mins - introduction & general questions via Mentimeter
10 mins - breakout group exercises
5 mins - reporting back breakout groups
5 mins - discussion and next steps

Speakers
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director of Community Engagement, NISO
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite


Thursday January 30, 2020 11:00am - 11:30am GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

11:30am GMT

Bridging the social and technical waters of an identifiers community: IGSN as a case study.
Like many groups building infrastructures, there are both technical and social issues that need to be resolved in building identifier systems. One team does not have the skills to develop everything and hence since the founding of the IGSN implementation organization we have run IGSN as two teams - a technical team and a social/business team. The technical team focuses on developing the best and most appropriate architecture, whilst the social/business team focuses on keeping the IGSN specific and relevant to samples, on outreach, governance, and ensuring buy-in and sustainability. Keeping both teams in balance and ensuring that the IGSN system is useable and relevant to all stakeholders can be a challenge. Sometimes the technical solutions are too ‘rich’ to implement, impacting the social team’s ability to grow community adoption while at other times the social team does not fully appreciate technical constraints.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We would propose to have a mix of presentations and then challenge the audience to self-identify into two teams “a Social team” and a “Technical team” and provide a list of critical issues and see if they can identify which issues should be solved by which team, and which must be solved by both. 

Speakers
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Doherty Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance that operates EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin... Read More →
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Honorary Professor, Australian National University


Thursday January 30, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

11:30am GMT

Performativity of PIDs: Observing or shaping research?
The rise of digital infrastructures and accompanying PIDs for scientific publications, data, software, projects and other outlets has triggered an unprecedented growth in data production with the promise to turn freely accessible data about scientific work into a comprehensive, interconnected network on the research system and its constituents for various use cases.

But at the same time this infrastructure plays a performative role in creating what it seeks to count and identify, namely, a particular understanding of science and research practice. Such digital infrastructures are never neutral but embody already in their design and the processing models behind them a particular understanding about the world and about its users (Mühlhoff 2018; Krüger et al. 2020). Bowker and Star have emphasized that “values, policies, and modes of practice become embedded in large information systems” (Bowker and Star 1999: 230). Digital infrastructures thus influence the practices they are supposed to support or reflect. They are performative because “[t]hey change the very nature of what it is to do work, and what work will count as legitimate” (Bowker and Star 1999: 239).

Given the raising “publish-or-perish” imperative we will highlight in a few examples how the digital infrastructure in bibliometrics shapes the results of bibliometric analysis on the research system and its contributors. Afterwards we like to invite the audience to discuss jointly if and how such observations are likely to carry over to other PIDs and speculate on probable implications for the acceptance of PIDs.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We will provide some telling examples and invite the audience to discuss them with us (as described in the abstract) [We tried for an interpretive dance of individual, bibliometric h-indices, but did not succeed. Sorry!]


Thursday January 30, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

11:30am GMT

Who is asking? Humans and machines experience a different scholarly web!
The notion of persistence of persistent identifiers (PIDs) has been studied in the past and it has been shown that digital object identifiers (DOIs) in particular do not necessarily point to the same content over time. Reasons for these observations can vary from human error to network outages.

We are approaching the question of reliability of identifying web content via PIDs from a slightly different angle. We investigate scholarly publishers and their responses to simple HTTP requests against DOIs using different HTTP clients and HTTP methods. We expect a web server's response to be the same, regardless of the type of client or method used. This expectation is supported by web standards and anticipated best practice in the community.

In this talk I will present preliminary results of our experiment to investigates responses to common HTTP requests against DOIs using a variety of HTTP clients and request methods. Our HTTP requests embrace characteristics that resemble either machine or human behavior on the web. We follow all links in the HTTP redirect chain starting with the DOI and analyze aspects such as the length of the chain and the status of the last link.

Our findings indicate that clients resembling human and machine-behavior indeed experience a different scholarly web or in other words, the answer to "a question" on the web depends on who is asking.

These results not only hint at the lack of adherence to best practice on the web by the (scholarly) community but also have real-world implications for crawling engineers that constantly need to adjust their tools to the dynamic nature of the web.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

I will introduce and motivate the topic of the talk by means of examples everyone can relate to, so no domain knowledge is needed to follow the presentation. I will further clearly state shortcomings of our approach as well as aspects of future work, both of which should make for a vivid discussion.

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

12:00pm GMT

Lunch
Thursday January 30, 2020 12:00pm - 1:00pm GMT
Vitorino Nemésio Room

1:00pm GMT

Keynote: "Dancing with the Scientists: The Costs of Piddling in Science without PIDs" (Kathryn Kaiser, University of Alabama at Birmingham)
Science has always been a messy and disjointed enterprise. However ugly, we clumsily lurch towards creating a more clear understanding of ourselves and our world. Along with one of the best methods we have not to fool ourselves (the scientific method), we have a tool for memory – the scientific record, which has been neglected for far too long. This presentation will outline some of the history of how we arrived at where we are, the costs of continuing on this pot-hole ridden path, and a proposed way forward that can create a smooth and danceable highway of discovery. The end of the talk will feature an interpretative dance by audience volunteers.

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Kaiser

Kathryn Kaiser

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama @ Birmingham
I am working towards making the scientific record a fully integrated, relational database that makes research permanently findable! These days, I can always be found working in Birmingham (guess which one!) 33.516136449924076, -86.77198727305536


Thursday January 30, 2020 1:00pm - 1:45pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

1:45pm GMT

Evolution or Revolution? PIDs for PID users
The case for using PIDs extensively and consistently has more or less been made which begs the question as to why they are not implemented as completely as one might wish?

The ARDC, through our National Information Infrastructure program, promotes the use of PID’s in the Australian research sector as a mechanism to link research concepts, funding, outputs, people, organisations, instruments, and objects; thereby creating a richer, more reliable, more coherent, more reproducible, and more reusable research environment.

Through this program the ARDC provides, supports and connects with several persistent identifier services including DOI, IGSN, Handle, ORCID and PURL.

In addition, the ARDC provides actual infrastructure and project funding and support so we are ourselves deeply interested in both the ability of PID’s to enable new and better research as well as how they can be used to reflect the impact of our activities. The question “how is the world better because it invested resources in the ARDC?” is key. The Research Activity Identifier (RAiD) was created to answer this question, being a model which links activities, inputs and outputs in the research lifecycle.

For ARDC to rely on PID’s we need to assume the identifier infrastructure itself is persistent and sustainable.

So, as an infrastructure operator with a particular set of drivers and desired outcomes from the use of PID's we’d like to ask some questions around whether harmonisation (and consolidation?) of PID’s and PID providers might facilitate sustainability (it’s perhaps easier to fund a PID provider who does it all?) and implementation (would it be easier to implement and use PIDs if they followed the same minting, usage, and governance models?).

Think of this as a devil’s advocate session, I’d love to understand if there are reasons why harmonisation and consolidation are not sensible next steps now that the use case for PID’s (but PID’s in total rather than as individuals) has more or less been made.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

Ideally this session would be largely audience interaction.  The questions to be posed range from the peripheral (“how might PID organisations share good practice?”) to fundamental (“Why, now that PID’s have been shown to be critical, would I not just set up an international PID organisation with my other government colleagues and standardise it all?”)

That second question might be a bit much, but you did ask for energetic and exciting!

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 1:45pm - 2:15pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

1:45pm GMT

Our Journey to the Clouds
EMBL-EBI has established Identifiers.org as a stable system for identification and citation of life science data, using Persistent Identifiers (PIDs). Identifiers.org not only enables researchers to easily reference their data, but also provides a variety of useful, supporting web services.
We have recently released a brand new cloud native modern identifiers.org platform, focused on its main mission, resolution of compact identifiers. This new platform brings more robust and reliable resolution services, new extended APIs for accessing and working with the registry, as well as the possibility for our users to deploy their own identifiers.org services in sync with our registry, on premises, hybrid cloud and multi-cloud environments.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

The session will count on a presentation with time for the audience to make questions

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Bernal Llinares

Manuel Bernal Llinares

Software and Cloud Lead Architect, EMBL-EBI


Thursday January 30, 2020 1:45pm - 2:15pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

1:45pm GMT

In-Text Reference Pointer Identifiers – InTRePIDs
To permit scholars to undertake deep citation analysis, and to discuss the textual context within a citing publication from which a particular citation is generated, a method is required for uniquely identifying each individual In-Text Reference Pointer (aka “in-text citation”) within the citing work.

We will present the In-Text Reference Pointer Identifier (acronym InTRePID) developed by OpenCitations, that is a new globally unique persistent identifier specific for individual In-Text Reference Pointers. The InTRePID builds on the Open Citation Identifier (OCI) that we introduced at PIDapalooza 2018.

We will then outline the InTRePID Resolution Service to be developed at OpenCitations, and will detail the metadata that will be returned to users, on submitting an InTRePID to that resolution service, from a database of In-Text Reference Pointers and their textual contexts.

Finally, we will discuss the potential usefulness of InTRePIDs for deep citation analysis, and for the determination of citation types and citation purpose by the use of human or artificial intelligence to study the textual context within which an In-Text Reference Pointer is located.

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 1:45pm - 2:15pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

2:15pm GMT

MERIL’s PIDdy Party!
One of the festival’s themes is persistence through sustainability. With MERIL, our goal is to achieve sustainability through persistence.

MERIL is the largest metadata repository for European research infrastructures (RIs). The last phase of the project yielded a trove of metadata, but identifiers—whether persistent or not—were not part of the cataloguing efforts, so the data cannot be remixed in research graphs like FREYA’s. We need PIDs for RIs, and we need to reuse existing PIDs to better describe scholarly entities other than RIs that are referenced in MERIL's metadata records. RIs are one of the lesser-known entities in the scholarly web, and we want to change that.

Unfortunately, work on MERIL was suspended indefinitely in late 2019. MERIL is the only database of its kind, and we believe it deserves both technical and financial support from European stakeholders. We will first briefly present the existing repository—post mortems are always fun, aren't they?—and then move to a discussion of our ideas to revive the project. Join us to discuss the future of MERIL and European RIs!

Speakers
avatar for Luc Boruta

Luc Boruta

Director of Research, Thunken


Thursday January 30, 2020 2:15pm - 2:45pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

2:15pm GMT

PID Party! Integrating PIDs in OS tools
Join Alison McGonagle-O'Connell and Simon Porter to learn about the PID subculture of OS integration implementations via examples from the Coko community including Micropublications.org and Digital Science platforms. As new OS tools and communities, emerge, they must integrate standards in order to thrive and survive. This session takes a look at how OS platforms are integrating standards- and includes time to discuss what else we should be thinking about.


Speakers
avatar for Alison McGonagle-O'Connell

Alison McGonagle-O'Connell

Senior Director of Marketing, HighWire Press


Thursday January 30, 2020 2:15pm - 2:45pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

2:15pm GMT

120 Resolutions a Second: The DOI Story
The first DOI applications were launched in 2000. There are now almost 200 million DOIs that have been registered and, astonishingly, there are more than 120 resolutions every second. The are DOI applications for all manner of scholarly publications, scientific data, movies and more. The DOI is often used as the example of a trustworthy PID system.

How did this happen? What were the ups and downs in the last 20 years? The key milestones? The failures? And what makes us think we will be here in 20 years from now?

This talk will answer these questions and more as we all jump aboard our time machine and travel back to the future of PID systems.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

My style is fun and engaging - I'd like to start by remembering where everyone was in 2000. I would encourage comments and questions throughout the session and certainly not wait until the end. My goal is to be open and transparent, warts and all!

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 2:15pm - 2:45pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

2:45pm GMT

Coffee break
Thursday January 30, 2020 2:45pm - 3:00pm GMT
Foyer by Sophia de Mello room

3:00pm GMT

Facilitating technical interoperability through improved social interoperability
In order improve the technical interoperability of heterogeneous PID systems, the community also must address the challenges of “social interoperability.” Institutional PID adoption can be slowed or even stymied not by the technology—but by the lack of relationships, trust, and knowledge. This can make it impossible to identify points of common interest or to effectively communicate the enterprise-wide value of PIDs.   In this talk I will share about a current OCLC Research project on Institutional Stakeholders in Research Support, oc.lc/stakeholders. We are examining the operations, goals, and pain points of university stakeholders supporting research support activities; developing personas to equip practitioners with greater knowledge for successfully managing enterprise projects; and collecting examples of intra-institutional collaboration in research support—good, bad, and ugly. We want the input of the Pidapalooza community on this project! This effort will result in an OCLC Research report in 2020.  

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

3:00pm GMT

The Use of PIDs in Research Assessments
The assessment of research outputs and impacts is a core contribution to many planning and decision processes in universities. However these assessment are often characterized by closedness and little involvement by the actual researchers being assessed. This talk will take starting point in outlining and discussing how PIDs – like eg. ORCID – can democratize and open up this process helping these assessments live up to parts of the Leiden Manifesto (http://www.leidenmanifesto.org/). The talk will furthermore discuss the benefits and challenges that comes with using PIDs in research assessment addressing questions such as: how do we ensure that the closed databases and commercial vendors integrate and keep the synergy with open/non-profit PIDs? and how do we encourage researchers to engage and benefit from the PIDs?

The talk will present thoughts and work being done in the Danish-funded project: DEFF OPERA – Open Research Analytics (https://deffopera.dk/), which overall aim is to establish open and advanced research analytics practices and systems at Danish universities and in the Danish landscape of research analytics stakeholders.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

Part of wanting to contribute to PIDapalooza is to test and share the ideas in the DEFF OPERA project connected to PIDs - a big part of this is to get feedback from the community. Therefore the session will incorporate a discussion/quiz  part where concrete cases and questions will be presented to the audience.


Thursday January 30, 2020 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

3:00pm GMT

MyCites, a concept for marking inaccurate citations
This talk starts with highlighting the importance of citations for the production of knowledge, and notes how inaccurate citations contribute to the production of low-quality evidence links. Then, it introduces the issue of inaccurate citations as a worth-while problem that needs more attention and further research. Subsequently, it mentions the difficulties of reporting inaccurate citations and introduces a digital concept that uses persistent identifiers to improve the accuracy of citations in scientific publication. MyCites is a concept for a browser plugin that would allow confirming/rejecting the accuracy, and annotating citations. While in its embryonic stages of development, it has received feedback from a variety of stakeholders who are active in the field of publications. After introducing envisaged capabilities of MyCites, an engaging session will commence that would encourage feedback and comments from the audience.  


Thursday January 30, 2020 3:00pm - 3:30pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

3:30pm GMT

Growing Strong: ORCID US Community
This session will primarily be an update on the status and current trends in the ORCID US Community (123+ institutions), formed in 2018 as a consortium for ORCID member research institutions in the US. Prior to 2018, ORCID was very low on the list of priorities at US research institutions. However, infused with new communication channels, resources like webinars and planning guides, and increased personalized outreach to member organizations, ORCID is steadily moving to the forefront of conversations around research information management and related endeavors. While there is still room for growth in terms of ORCID adoption, and DOI usage in some disciplines, best practices are emerging and pathways forward are becoming more clear for the US research institution community that will perhaps resonate with other PID communities and other areas of the globe.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

I am thinking of having a handout/game where participants are asked to put themselves in the position of a research administrator at an institution, then they would be asked to select strategies from a list for 3 components: internal stakeholder support, technical integration, and outreach/education - the point being that there are many different approaches to institutional ORCID adoption (also applicable to other PIDs) and they can mix and match different strategies - then I will cover the actual strategies that are emerging as best practices in the US in the talk/presentation, then discussion would ensue...

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT
Maria Helena Vieira Room

3:30pm GMT

Administrative Identifiers vs ORCID iDs for Disambiguating Researchers: A Study Using a National CRIS
The Czech Research and Development and Innovation Information System is a governmental Current Research Information System (CRIS) for the Czech Republic with a good coverage of research outputs produced by Czech universities, the Academy of Sciences and other institutions. While it has traditionally used a national administrative identifier for researchers, since 2018 it also allows institutions to report the ORCID iDs of the researchers that were affiliated with them.

On the past two years’ worth of data from this CRIS we analyze the coverage the two identifier systems and their correspondence. We classify and quantify ambiguities in the identification. We discuss ways of resolving such ambiguities.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

(1)    Be brief.
(2)    Invite people from funding agencies, national ORCID consortia and ORCID itself to discuss their experience with profile ambiguities and their resolution.

Speakers

Thursday January 30, 2020 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

3:30pm GMT

Infrastructure ID: When three PIDs are better than one.
Tracking the impact of shared research infrastructures and facilities is a tough problem. ORCID and the US DOE have presented at previous PIDapaloozas on their work to tie access to infrastructures to people. SURF has developed a concept that tries to go beyond this, to create a richer picture of the links between researchers, funders and facilities. The SURF infrastructure ID concept uses three linked IDs: ORCID, Crossref’s Grant ID, and ARDC’s Research Activity ID (RAiD). In this approach, we leverage the unique features of each of these three ID systems, and show how they interact to provide a flexible, scalable solution for Dutch national supercomputer resources. Access to these resources is allocated as a form a research funding. Tying these PID systems into existing workflows, and linking them up to established reporting workflows (which themselves leverage PIDs like DOIs for outputs) delivers significantly improved capacity to monitor/evaluate infrastructure utilization and find associated research outcomes. In this presentation, we outline a range of PID-optimized workflows which are enabled by our core synergy, and show they in turn use other other PIDs to enable more efficient, accurate and timely monitoring, reporting, and evaluation.

How would you run the session to support the spirit of PIDapalooza as a laid-back, welcoming, energetic and exciting meeting, and ensure at least 10 minutes of your session are used to interact with the audience?

We'll keep it short and focussed, and we'll have plants in the audience from other countries who are tackling the same problem (Australia, the UK and the US) who will challenge us on what we did and how it compares to their approaches. That will open it right up to be a whole-audience debate about how combining different PID systems can be done effectively in differing contexts, and will guarantee that it won't just be two guys droning on in front of some slides. 

Speakers
avatar for Clifford Tatum

Clifford Tatum

SURF / CWTS, Leiden University
Consultant, Persistent Identifiers (innovation group) at SURF, in the Netherlands. And researcher at CWTS, Leiden University, focusing on infrastructures of openness in relation to emerging evaluation practices.


Thursday January 30, 2020 3:30pm - 4:00pm GMT
Amália Rodrigues Room

4:00pm GMT

Closing remarks
Moderators
avatar for PIDapalooza Committee

PIDapalooza Committee

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite

Thursday January 30, 2020 4:00pm - 4:30pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room

4:30pm GMT

Closing ceremony
Speakers
avatar for PIDapalooza Committee

PIDapalooza Committee

PIDapalooza
Roadies from California Digital Library, ORCID, Crossref, and DataCite


Thursday January 30, 2020 4:30pm - 4:45pm GMT
Sophia de Mello Room
 
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